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Posts Tagged ‘Númenor’

Everything is awesome!

Well, that has nothing to do with Lord of the Rings, but I saw The Lego Movie tonight, and it’s really worth it. Not to plug for totally unrelated stuff, but really. Best movie for me, at least right now.

Anyway, let’s return to Aragorn and Gandalf’s mountain jaunt!

I'm too old for this...

I’m too old for this…

Of course, there has to be a point to this. Gandalf tells Aragorn that his (Gandalf’s) time in Middle-earth is ending, and Aragorn must lead the remaining men well as their king. The lands before him will all be under his dominion. However, Aragorn is waiting for some kind of sign. Gandalf tells him to turn around, and Aragorn sees a single tree growing out of the mountainside. It’s a tree similar to the white tree that Gondor prizes so highly, though it’s impossible to know how it rooted or grew up here.

First Mentions:

-Nimloth: Ancient white tree of Númenor, descended from…

-Galathilion: Ancient white tree made and tended by the Valar, descended from…

-Telperion: One of the great Two Trees, white and shining with a silver light. Yes, there are better records of the ancestry of some trees than of certain family lines.

This is a play by Gandalf to tell Aragorn to get a move on in letting things (read: his friends) go. Aragorn seems to be worried that his line will fail just like all those before him, and somehow this tree signifies for him that it will not. That’s putting a lot of faith in trees, but whatever.

*glorious music*

*glorious music*

Meanwhile, as Gandalf mentions that the Third Age is ending, I have to wonder who decides all these things? What authority is sitting in their towers saying: “Oh, I think it’s time to start a new age. Tell your friends!”? I would assume that it’s actually someone like Gandalf or Elrond, but we don’t get specifics. There has to be some system like the one that Westeros employs with maesters sending ravens here and there to tell people important things.

Words My Computer Didn’t Like:

-unmingled

utúvienyes

-Nimloth

-Galathilion

-Telperion

Believe in yourselves, friends, and you too can rule the reunited kingdoms of men.

Wait, was that what I learned today? Shoot.

No one dies today.

“‘But this is an ancient hallow, and ere the kings failed or the Tree withered in the…'”

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At the very moment when defeat seems imminent, victory is won.

No, I’m not talking about how Frodo and Sam manage to destroy the ring right as all their friends are surrounded and outnumbered. Éowyn looks to Faramir for comfort, and they hold hands, right after she calls him “my friend”.

Middle school me would've felt so uncomfortable.

Middle school me would’ve felt so uncomfortable.

They stand facing northward, the very direction that Aragorn marched away. It’s been a week since he left, and Faramir remarks that meeting Éowyn has both encouraged and scared him in that time. Now, as darkness draws down upon them, he has something to lose.

All is silent and still, eerily so. A darkness looms above the mountains, and a sudden tremor shakes all of Minas Tirith. Faramir tells of the old kingdom of Númenor and its fall, but he doesn’t believe that such an evil is happening now.

Yeah, this very much appears to be the moment that the ring is destroyed. Of course, from Minas Tirith, where no news has come in a week, no one has any clue what’s going on. Something big has happened, but that’s about all you can know. Not knowing is just as terrifying as knowing of some doom, because people are all terrible pessimistic beings.

And that makes this puppy sad.

And that makes this puppy sad.

And so, Faramir and Éowyn stand, fingers intertwined, falling in love at the possible end of the world. Can you picture it any other way? Just the most romantic.

No one dies today.

“‘But my heart says nay; and all my limbs are tight, and a hope…'”

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This is the second to last page of the second to last book. Believe it or not, we’re only a small bit over 100 pages before the end. And…much less than that until we get to the end of the part where most people think this book ends.

Multiple endings?

Multiple endings?

Today’s page is a look into Pippin’s mind as the armies charge towards him. Part of him wishes Merry were here, just so they could die together. Another part of Pippin wishes that he was back at Minas Tirith with his friend, and hopefully awaiting an easier end than this one. He looks to his sword, believing that this must be the very sort of battle that it was made for, with its engravings of ancient Númenor. Pippin withstands the first charge, fighting beside Beregond, but watches the guard stricken down by a troll. Before the troll can bite Beregond’s neck (yeah, it was going to do that), Pippin thrusts his sword into it, killing the creature, but trapping himself beneath its body.

It’s hard to say if Beregond has died or not. Certainly Pippin saved him from a mutilation, but his life is uncertain. Pippin, meanwhile, loses consciousness beneath the troll.

If nothing else, lying beneath a troll may be one of the safer places on the battlefield. If you’re alive, no one can really know you’re there. Just lay there, conscious or not, until things blow over. Hopefully by then the smell won’t be too bad.

And in warfare there's no pinfall elimination!

And in warfare there’s no pinfall elimination!

This is where we’re going to leave this set of heroes, locked in a tense battle with no real hope. Pippin, our true lens into this side of the story, is knocked out.

There’s a little bit more tomorrow, but I don’t expect much from it.

Days Until The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug: 13

“Blackness and stench and crushing pain came upon Pippin, and his mind fell away into a great darkness.”

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Our broken heroes are all accounted for now in the Houses of Healing: Faramir, Éowyn, and Merry. Faramir’s fever labors on, while Éowyn and Merry suffer from a mysterious sickness that has been dubbed “the Black Shadow”. Its victims slip into a dark dream, and they die cold and troubled.

Sounds lovely!

Sounds lovely!

Of course, this sickness comes somehow from the Ringwraiths, and it’s no surprise that Éowyn and Merry are struck so badly. The healers can only watch and listen to see if there is anything that they can possibly do. One such, the oldest of them all, mourns over the probable losses. She says that it was said once that the true king of Gondor has a healing touch. If only such a king were to arrive!

First Mentions:

-Ioreth: Eldest healer. Her name will constantly remind me of Irileth, royal annoyance at Whiterun in Skyrim. I have issues sometimes…

Anyway, though she claims that she hasn’t heard a thing about the rumors of a king arriving (after Gandalf prods her), Ioreth seems to be keyed into the mood of the moment. Of course, Aragorn has indeed come, and with the sun setting, he is just now riding into the city. It isn’t exactly foreshadowing, since we know all that already, but Ioreth is certainly foreshadowing for this segment of the story, where we technically haven’t heard about all that.

All in all, though, this isn’t a very exciting page. We have three heroes sleeping and one watching diligently, still slightly bemoaning the fact that he should be out on the battlefield. The most interesting note, which has nothing to do with anything else, is a brief aside that the lifespan of men is decreasing. Men of old lived long lives. Not immortal, but still hundreds of years. With the fall of Númenor, men migrating to Middle-earth coupled with those that had already been living there. These “lower” men had shorter lifespans, and this mingling has led to the decline in what once was a proud (and kind of elitist) people. Of course, purer bloodlines still live longer than those dirty mudbloods.

How disgusting!

How disgusting!

Words My Computer Didn’t Like:

-Ioreth

I have to admit, I guess I shouldn’t have expected much action in the chapter titled “The Houses of Healing”. Phooey.

Days Until The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug: 45

No one dies today.

“‘I have been too busy with this and that to heed all the crying and…'”

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Success is great, especially when you’re taking a huge gamble that everyone else is afraid to take.

In short, Aragorn gets confirmation from the dead that they will fight for him.

They could have just called...

They could have just called…

The riders go through the lands, where people are in hiding, and come to the Stone of Erech, a man-height stone placed here when Isildur landed from Númenor. The conversation (between Aragorn and a disembodied voice) is pretty simple. Aragorn asks why they have come. They respond that they have come to fulfill their oath. And that’s settled. Aragorn has a dark banner unfurled, that was brought along with the rangers, and I would assume that this is a kingly war standard.

First Mentions:

-Pelargir: Largest port of Gondor, and in constant conflict with corsairs from the south. Come to think of it, most of the borders of Gondor are always in constant conflict.

So…that was easy. Really. Did Aragorn stop at Staples before heading out this morning? I’m getting a sense that fortunes are turning, even though there’s so much left to accomplish. I figure that something good had to happen at the beginning of Return of the King, since Frodo and Sam were left on such a cliffhanger at the end of Two Towers. We’re feeling better now, so this next battle part won’t be such a trying ordeal.

Yes, ha ha, there’s a battle coming up. I don’t even know if that counts as a spoiler, since it’s been so obvious.

Lots of bad coupons going around.

Lots of bad coupons going around.

On an unrelated note, I watched parts of Return of the King on TV before I started writing. Golly, that’s so different! The plot diverges more and more the further you get from the beginning (the very beginning, that is), and the interspersing of Frodo and Sam’s bits in with the rest of the gang breaks everything up, even though it really does keep the entire story driving that way.

Words My Computer Didn’t Like:

-Pelargir

And those poor country folk! They’re so scared!

No one dies today.

“Then there was silence, and not a whisper nor a sigh was heard again all the long night. The…”

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It’s another late-night post, but that’s only because I spent the last 4-5 hours creating a character for my first ever game of D&D. I think that’s a valid reason. He’s a human ranger named Mycall Traeneth.

Like Aragorn, but with a darker backstory.

Like Aragorn, but with a darker backstory.

Anyway, my head is full of ideas for that going forward, and we’ll see where this goes tonight.

In terms of Lord of the Rings (one of the original sources behind D&D, mind you), Faramir finishes talking about the history of Gondor, and the men that inhabit this region. I honestly have a big problem discerning what he says, because his sentence structure is truly bizarre. I don’t like that at all. I especially don’t like being unsure of what’s going on. But, that’s over, so no more worrying for me.

Sam brings up that Faramir speaks kindly of the elves, but didn’t say too much about his dealings with them. In truth, as Faramir replies, he has little dealings with them at all, but men and elves have grown apart. However, there has always been a high esteem for the elves among his people. Time has simply sundered them from each other. Sam likes elves. We’ve been over this.

First Mentions:

-the Edain: The ancient men, in existence before the kingdom of Númenor was even established. They were known as three great houses, and the great kings descended from these lines.

As I said, it’s hard to figure out every little detail that Faramir brings up, because everything is worded very strangely. For example, he says: “Yet now, if the Rohirrim are grown in some ways more like to us, enhanced in arts and gentleness, we too have become more like to them, and can scarce claim any longer the title High.” There’s got to be a better way to say that.

On second thought, let's not try.

On second thought, let’s not try.

I feel wrong questioning Tolkien’s word choices, but hey, I guess that’s what I’m here to do! I wish it were a little easier to figure this backstory out. There’s a reason it’s in there, and I’m missing parts of it.

Words My Computer Didn’t Like:

-Edain

Perhaps I just need to get out of this talky-talking space and into some more action. Faramir’s been grilling Frodo and Sam for a long while now. The break for dinner was nice, but we’re right back at it.

No one dies today.

“‘I am only a hobbit, and gardening’s my job at home, sir, if you understand me, and I’m not much good at poetry…'”

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It’s a history lesson today, and one that we’ve heard parts of before. The history of Gondor!

Part 1!

Part 1!

Basically, it’s been a failure of past-thinking kings. Ancient Númenóreans concerned themselves with trying to live forever, or at least leaving a great legacy. They didn’t think to foster strong future generations. Slowly, childless kings brought about the end of the line. The stewards took over from there, making friends with northern men who aided them in battle. These people became the Rohirrim when Gondor granted them the lands just to the north of Gondor, now Rohan. Though not descended from the men of Númenor, these men think of themselves just as powerful.

First Mentions:

-Cirion: The 12th steward of Gondor. Denethor is 26th, for reference. Cirion first allied with the men who now live in Rohan.

-Calenardhon: The region to the north of Gondor, now known as Rohan. Rohan is a better name, anyway.

Yes, we heard some of this history earlier with Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimil visiting Rohan. It had more of a Rohan skew, but it was much the same. In fact, it might even be happening right now. Parallels!

It's plane to see.

It’s plane to see.

It’s an interesting trick of writing like this, where two stories are happening simultaneously. Which half did Tolkien write first? Did he work on both at once? It’s very possible, unsure of which was to go first, he put this bit of history in both perspectives. With a little editing, they turn out not to be the exact same histories, but they’re undoubtedly similar.

Words My Computer Didn’t Like:

-Cirion

-Calenardhon

-Goldenhaired

Oh, a surprise word there! That was thrilling.

No one dies today.

“‘For so we reckon Men in our lore, calling them the High, or Men of the West, which were Númenóreans; and the Middle Peoples,…'”

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