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Posts Tagged ‘Boromir’

Before you think that Faramir is getting friend-zoned, read on.

Still hurts.

Still hurts.

Éowyn heads back into the Houses of Healing, wanting to get away from everyone, but Faramir enlists the help of the warden to meet with Merry. Merry tells Faramir something of Éowyn, and Faramir uses that to his advantage. He sees Éowyn the next morning, and calls for her to come down to the garden with him. She does so, and for the next few days they walk and talk much together. Faramir even has an old gown brought up for her, one that was made long ago for his mother.

First Mentions:

-Finduilas: Mother of Boromir and Faramir, and thus, somehow, the bride of Denethor. That must have been awful.

Apparently Finduilas died unexpectedly at an early age, so possibly that’s why Denethor had such a dreary outlook on life. Though that happens often in stories, I find it rather tiresome. I guess I just don’t believe that the loss of someone can spiral you downward so much. I’m just heartless like that, maybe?

Either way, it’s important to know that Faramir has clothed Éoywn in his mother’s old gown. You don’t do that for just any girl, especially when you’re the ruler of such a place like Gondor and Minas Tirith. This is hugely symbolic.

THIS is hugely cymbalic.

THIS is hugely cymbalic.

But ugh, I’m just feeling bogged down by this storyline. After so much happened to shape the course of Middle-earth, we have to go back and hear about the courtship of Faramir and Éowyn. It just doesn’t measure up anymore. Sorry.

Words My Computer Didn’t Like:

-Finduilas

Move it along now!

No one dies today.

“The mantle was wrought for his mother, Finduilas of Amroth, who died untimely, and was to him but a memory of loveliness in far days and of his first grief; and her robe seemed to him raiment fitting for the beauty and sadness of Éowyn.”

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So be it?! Denethor just threatened Faramir with death for his…um, decisions (which were fine, by the way), and that’s all Faramir can muster in response? Gosh, when we heard last chapter about Rohan mustering, I didn’t realize that they’d be the best mustering we’d see.

We must to the muster!

We must to the muster!

What follows is an argument between father and son over whether Boromir would have been better suited for this task, and anguish over the fact that Denethor wishes that he had sent Faramir to die rather than Boromir. Again, bad parenting. Gandalf steps in to say that Boromir would never have given the ring willingly to Denethor (ah yes, Denethor does know about the ring), and instead would have kept it for himself. Denethor counters that his wish would have been to keep the ring safe in hiding, and only use it in extreme need.

Sure. Yeah. That would have worked out fine.

In all his lore, and all his knowledge, and all his…everything, did Denethor never read that the ring has power over the minds of men? In fact, THAT WAS ITS PURPOSE. It’s a tool of mind control, plain and simple, and it’s always at work, whether at the hand of Sauron or not. Please tell me, somewhere, that this was written down. Gandalf can’t possibly be the only one who understood this.

However, it’s also possible that the ring has already been at work on Denethor’s mind. It’s calling for him to take it and use it in folly. Now, Denethor has a secret that he’s been keeping, and he’s definitely already under some control of Sauron. I don’t rightly recall when it comes up, but Denethor has himself a palantír. Sauron could be working through it.

Someone hasn't been heeding the posted warnings.

Someone hasn’t been heeding the posted warnings.

But that is not where we are yet. I don’t necessarily like bringing things up before we hit them, but this seemed relevant. It might explain Denethor’s actions, to some extent. And, well, they’re pretty hard to understand.

No one dies today.

“‘You think, as is your wont, my lord, of Gondor only,’ said…”

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The more details, the more Gandalf gets uneasy, and Denethor broods. He broods well. But I can’t condone brooding. Gandalf wants to know exactly when, exactly, Faramir parted ways with Frodo and Sam, and how far away they were from entering Mordor. They parted two days ago, in the morning. (Yeah, I’m not going to go and line up every storyline, but you get the idea that it was around the time that Gandalf and Pippin were riding to Minas Tirith.)

Timing works out so that it couldn’t have been possible that Sauron’s assault on Gondor was due to him reacquiring the ring. So, that means things are alright, I guess.

Faramir spent some time on an island in the river before returning to the city, and sent most of his men to garrison Osgiliath before riding off with his three best companions. He looks to Denethor for approval, who shuts him down in the worst of ways. Bad parenting, exhibit A.

Faramir doesn't even like toast!

Faramir doesn’t even like toast!

First Mentions:

-Cair Andros: Long island in Anduin, stretching ten miles in length. This is a sort of base of operations for the men under Faramir who patrol the eastern shores.

Basically, Denethor accuses Faramir of lying to him, mostly by omission. Denethor likes to believe that he knows and sees all, and he can tell that something is being left out. In accusing his remaining son, he longs for Boromir to be around to act as a true son and heir. Ouch. It’s not like he would have done anything differently, but Denethor just liked him so much more than Faramir.

Of course, Faramir tells his father that he wishes he would have been told what to do in this situation, but who would have predicted it? For Denethor, any decision Faramir makes is the wrong one, so it’s a no-win situation no matter how you look at it.

Middle-earth is any normal business.

Middle-earth is any normal business.

I’m just going to bring up briefly that I have no answer to our grammatical problem from yesterday. We’re just going to pretend it never happened.

Words My Computer Didn’t Like:

-Cair

-Andros

So…does Denethor know about the ring? Did Faramir say something about it, or is that the omission?

No one dies today.

“‘But in desperate hours gentleness may be repaid with death.'”

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A little observation never hurt anyone, and Pippin is much better off watching all this go down. He sees Gandalf emit some sort of white light, and the Ringwraiths are driven off. Gandalf meets with Faramir on the plain, and they go into Minas Tirith with Faramir’s companions walking alongside them. Pippin runs to the citadel, where he expects Gandalf and Faramir to arrive before too long. A crowd has already gathered, and the wizard and Faramir push their way through. Faramir looks tired, possibly wounded, and in recovery from a great fear.

Oh deer.

Oh deer.

Even with that look on his face, Pippin sees the nobility in Faramir. He looks like Boromir (no one will ever stop making that connection), but with more responsibility. Pippin also sees why someone like Beregond would so easily follow Faramir into peril. Even though Pippin liked Boromir from the start, he likes Faramir even more.

Wait, Pippin liked Boromir? What was wrong with him?

Oh, right. Pippin is the one constantly getting himself in trouble. I’m not ever going to trust his judgement calls.

This blog needs more cats.

This blog needs more cats.

However, we’re about to have our first Frodo/Sam-everyone else crossover moment. Faramir has seen them. He knows things. He will tell people things. The plot will advance.

As it does every day.

And it will again the next day.

No one dies today.

“‘Faramir!’ he cried aloud with the others. ‘Faramir!’ And Faramir,…”

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Théoden is beginning a brief retelling of Brego and Baldor’s discovery of the Paths of the Dead way back when. So that’s cool.

A cranky old man sat on the doorstep of the darkness when they approached.

Stoop kid of Middle-earth.

Stoop kid of Middle-earth.

Stoop kid old guy utters some pretty foreboding things as they try to pass him, then dies. Like, right on the spot. Dead. That was enough to scare Brego and Baldor off, at least until Baldor came back some time later and found his death.

The conversation lulls, and a ruckus is heard outside. A guard bursts in to announce a messenger from Gondor. He introduces himself as Hirgon, coming directly from Denethor, asking for Rohan’s aid in the war with all speed.

First Mentions:

-Hirgon: This here messenger. Said to look like Boromir.

Wait, Merry thinks that Hirgon looks like Boromir? Well, that’s a red herring. At first, I assumed that this meant that the man was Faramir, since the brothers do share a resemblance to one another. I found this strange, since I had no memory of Faramir coming all this way to meet with Théoden. Of course, it would explain how he hasn’t yet returned to Minas Tirith, all the while leaving Gandalf to worry where he is.

There’s also something here with a red arrow.

As pictured.

As pictured.

No, actually, it’s a red-tipped arrow, like, one that you would shoot from a bow. It’s some sort of war summons, and Théoden looks at it with all the required gravitas. So…it’s a big deal. But what does it mean, exactly?

Words My Computer Didn’t Like:

-Hirgon

Hey, it’s another cliffhanger to hold over until tomorrow!

No one dies today.

“‘The Red Arrow!’ said Théoden, holding it, as one who receives a summons long expected and yet dreadful when it comes. His hand…”

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Talking in theory about the war to come, Pippin and Beregond are depressed, then hopeful, and so on and so forth. There’s a lot to think about before all this starts. A shadow of fear is the first feeling on this page, as both think that something dark and evil blocked out the sun for a moment.

That little spot? Totally evil.

That little spot? Totally evil.

Next up, Pippin brings some hope. He’s seen Gandalf fall, yet he returned. Who is to say that this is the end of all things good? Gondor will continue, Beregond agrees. Even if they have to abandon Minas Tirith, the kingdom will be remembered in hiding.

While that’s not the most optimistic outlook, it’s better than nothing. Beregond also hopes that Faramir will provide a boost whenever he returns to the city.

I guess we can live with that. LITERALLY. Dying would be bad.

So bad.

So bad.

Hope is necessary in the face of this insurmountable evil. Fear is Sauron’s greatest power. He can mass armies, cover the lands in darkness, and send his terrifying servants to battle. However, any small warrior can combat that fear by simply not fearing it.

Easier said than done, of course. What Gondor truly needs is a leader, and Denethor is doing a very poor job of being one. Boromir wasn’t a bad option, but he’s dead, so the burden falls to Faramir. Beregond clearly knows that he’ll help when he arrives. But…when will that be?

No one dies today.

“‘Our reach is shortened, and we…'”

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So maybe I was too quick to jump all over Pippin. Surprisingly, Gandalf is quite supportive of the choices that Pippin made in talking to Denethor. Offering himself up for service? Great idea! Staying away from talking about Aragorn? Well done. However, Denethor is clearly going to imply certain things from the story. For one, it’s clear that Boromir wasn’t the leader of the Fellowship Company. Denethor can take much away from what he was told, and Gandalf looks forward to seeing what he does with this new knowledge.

Read your scrolls well, young Denethor.

Read your scrolls well, young Denethor.

In the meantime, Gandalf can only wait to see what will happen next. His power is limited in terms of being able to influence events that are already set in motion.

“The board is set, and the pieces are moving.”

Good game, or BEST game?

Good game, or BEST game?

Yes, that quote is lifted directly from text to film. In both instances, Gandalf and Pippin stare out across the landscape, although in this scene they’re a little more hopeful. Their meeting with Denethor in the movie is filled with much more angst. Here, Gandalf almost understands Denethor’s motives. He still dislikes the man, but admires his tenacity in a way. Heck, he compares him more to Faramir than Boromir! That seems backwards, but whatever.

No one dies today.

“‘I do not think that he is in the City; but I have…'”

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